Crosman Slip-On Suppressors Are Back… Kind Of.

Crosman Slip-On Suppressors Are Back… Kind Of.


I’ve included the most important information in BOLD if you just want the cliff notes.

Our slip-on suppressor for the Crosman 22XX, 760, etc. has been our best-seller by far. They worked great, but I knew they could be better. So I went on a journey to improve them and ended up messing them up instead. The issue is that 3d printers are finnicky, or cheap ones are anyway, and I expected too much from them. I incorporated a few great features that required very precise and reliable printers, which I did not have. I guess that makes me the issue. Now that you’ve heard the backstory, I can share with you some good news and bad news.

The Good News


I recently just decided to buy a few better printers and use a tougher polymer, namely Polycarbonate. To get a more reliable and precise fit I now drill out each suppressor to final size before they ship out. This means the suppressors will be much tougher than before and the fit will be more consistent. We are, once again, selling slip-on suppressors with no front sight post.

The Bad News


I‘m not ready to sell the slip-ons with an integrated front sight post. Now that I drill out each suppressor for a reliable internal diameter I cannot include a flat clocking feature to align the front sight post. I have some options, but it’s going to take me some time to get it all worked out.

You’re welcome and I’m sorry. I’ll start fiddling with them again in January. For now, I’ll be focusing on whittling down my LONG list of customer suggestions. Check out the listing below for more info:

4 thoughts on “Crosman Slip-On Suppressors Are Back… Kind Of.

  1. I’m not ready for one of these yet, but I will be and I am SO HAPPY to see that Buck-Rail has a solution. I’ve done some preliminary research for what I want my 2240 build to be and was really hoping for this as I don’t like any of the other options. I’ll grab one of these as soon as I start that build. Thanks Terry!

  2. You dont need.to add a flat to clock the supressor. You rotate the can to orient the sight post as perfectly vertical as you can. Tighten the set screw and leave it alone. Done

    1. Yeah, the set screw is an option I had some success with. You can’t thread a small set screw into FDM plastic so I made a version with an inset nut inside the suppressor that is hard as hell to install. Once it was installed it worked fine. If the nut falls out though I know folks would have issues with it. If every single print came out exactly the same I could just make the nut a tight fit all around, but that brings us back to the printer issue. One day I’ll have fancier printers and all of my design woes will go away. For now I’m a bit limited. P.S. Not going to Shot Show this year. I’ve put the masked life behind me. P.P.S Akela Tri-Rail prototype 1 is on the printer right now. Cheers.

  3. Terry, calling West System Epoxy company in Bay City, Michigan will probably be beneficial. You’ll be connected to talk with an engineer. My guess is a few drops of their G-Flex 650 will hold the nut in place with 70,000 psi shear. ph. 866•937•8797.

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